Stuff To Be Proud Of: Looking Back on August

August was the first month of putting my new work system into action. It began in June when I outlined all the major projects I want to tackle in the next 4-5 years, across a variety of mediums. In July, I mapped out a general timeline for each of these projects and plotted all the little goals I would need to get there (they say that breaking big tasks into smaller ones is a hallmark of productivity.) In August, I abided by a daily schedule, which would accumulate in 8-10 goals I wanted to achieve by the end of the month. So how did I do?

On a task-to-task basis, if you count up all the items on my August calendar, I completed about 75% of my tasks. Not bad for a newb, I think. If you look at my actual goals, I only achieved about 2/10 fully – although many were partially completed. Overall…

Things I Did Great At:

Editing my web series, Dead Air. This web series was originally realized in my sophomore year of high school, and I filmed a lot of my Broadcast Journalism class goofing around in order to create it. Eight years later, Dead Air has remained a dream. I decided to tackle it now in order to give my videography background another credit. I wanted to finish one episode by the end of the month, and I am about 95% of the way there. I really enjoy editing, but I especially enjoy tinkering with this footage. I don’t have any doubts that all five episodes will be complete by January, which is the big picture goal.

– Writing Paradisa. I wanted to finish the entirety of Draft Six, and came about 8000 words short. I did write  13,000 words for Paradisa this month though. Part of the reason I fell short was a purposeful priority shuffle, considering that I’m starting a 9 day vacation at the end of this week ;) I knew I’d have plenty of free time over Labor Day to pump out those last 8k, so I diverted my sputtering August energy to short stories instead.

Outlining my Kindle business. This is also super fun, so I had no problem tackling it. I want to start selling Kindle erotica next year for some extra money, and coming up with all the different pseudonyms, storylines, etc., is oddly enjoyable. Don’t worry – when I start publishing in January, you guys will be with me every step of the way! I will be very open about the financial results of my little Kindle experiment. I will also try publishing some nonfiction next year, but I’ll talk more about that when we get there.

Reading. I finished The Disaster Artist this month, which I will reflect on during my end-of-year book post. I also started J.J. Abram’s S, I read a few stories from a Vladimir Nabokov short story collection, I skimmed through some mythological books…so I’m pretty satisfied! This is way more reading than I’ve accomplished in a while, and I feel like it’s not taking any extra time. I’m mostly replacing “scrolling through Facebook” with reading, and I now read 30 minutes before bed. That’s it. In September, I will continue with S, and will read The Martian and The Maze Runner books.

Things I Did Okay At:

– Short Stories.  I wrote 5500 words of a story called Ambrosia, and about 1000 words on a story about workplace harassment. I also wrote a poem called In The Event of My Death, and I revised an older piece from college. Still, I missed about 4 deadlines that I wanted to hit because I didn’t finish my two main stories. Part of this is because of all the work I did on Paradisa. Part of it was lack of inspiration, as I’m not really a great short author. I’m not going to be too down on myself about August’s progress, but I do hope to improve my short story turnaround times in the future.

– Literary submissions. I wanted to send out 20 stories. I only sent out 8, mostly because I didn’t finish any of my short stories, so I ran out of pieces to submit. Additionally, I’m running out of publications that accept flash fiction and/or simultaneous submissions. Most of what I’m sending out now is flash. *shrug* If I manage to finish Ambrosia in the next week, I’ll be able to catch up a bit. I’m sure I will get much closer to 20 in September.

Animation Tutorials – Planned to do 4, only did 2. I’m remedying this by setting aside an hour a day for animation and modeling practice in 3Ds Max, rather than an hour every Tuesday. I know I have the time, and I do quite enjoy it. It’s just a matter of making sure the timing is manageable.

My Writing Journal – Granted, I didn’t start this til the 16th. I think I’ve written four entries between then and now. I’d like to make this a daily, or at least every-other-day thing.

Things I Sucked At:

– Motion Capture. I pretty much tanked at this. I didn’t work on my motion capture site, I didn’t work on my email list, I didn’t get my Kinect set up. Luckily, none of this was urgent. It needs to get done in September, though. I’m trying to brainstorm and schedule mocap stuff in a way that encourages me to actually do it this month.

– Working on Saturdays. No more of that. I need Saturdays to rest. I assumed all this creative stuff would be fun and wouldn’t feel like work, but it does feel like work sometimes. Especially fiction writing. So if I fully take off Saturdays, I hope I will  have the energy to use Sundays as a truly productive work day.

It’s not perfect, but it’s progress. I think that setting really high goals is a great way to be productive, because even if you fall short, you still end up miles ahead of where you’d be otherwise. Yeah, I was a little short on finishing Paradisa Draft Six, but it looks like I’ll have that 40,000 word rewrite done with only 2.5 months of work. That’s crazy, considering it took me 7 months to do the same amount of work on Draft Five! And the fact that I’ve nearly finished a web series episode, I’ve written 6k+ worth of short story, I’ve put my work out there to 8 places….yeah, I may have fallen short of the goals, but 80% of “awesome” is still “pretty great” ;)

Seven Habits of Highly Effective Writers

For the past month, I have lived by a grid telling me what to do each day. For Type B people, this may seem ludicrous. But since graduating from college, I’ve been winging it and have almost nothing to show except one long suffering manuscript and no progress on other endeavors. I wasted two years that I could have been building my film portfolio. Two years I could have been freelancing my graphics skills. Two years I could have been writing and publishing short fiction.

I’m not wasting time anymore.

But a schedule means nothing without discipline, and that discipline is something I have to grow. I don’t meet all my goals every week. I barely meet my goals every month. But I do reach 70-80% of them, and it gets easier every day. By the end of 2015, I hope these goals will instead be habits. And since the point of this blog is to share both my progress and philosophies so that they may help other writers, here are a few tips to transform ideals into real habits:

Multiple projects. I wasn’t always a supporter of this, mostly because one project tends to overwhelm my brain at a time, leaving no inspiration for other things. In some ways, this remains true – I still can’t write two novels at once. But a novel and a short story? That’s okay. A short story and a website? That’s cool too. Spreading your projects across different mediums is a great brain hack, because I think we all have a set of muses instead of just one. You can fire all of them up at the same time and work steadily on everything, rather than burning out “the novel muse” before you’re even done with it.

Meditation. You know how the best ideas come to you in the shower, or on the ride to work, or as you’re about to fall asleep? There’s a reason – those moments are when your mind is most relaxed (assuming you’re not driving in D.C. traffic every day!) Stepping back and letting your mind wander is like instant inspiration. I swear, half the plot twists for Paradisa were born in the bathroom. You could try setting aside 15-30 minutes every day to physically meditate, but I personally haven’t made time for that yet. Instead, I harness my brain’s natural meditation cycles by keeping a small memo pad close by, and by using my smartphone’s voice recorder app. Like dreams, a lot of ideas and writing envisioned during this period can be fleeting, and I don’t want to forget them!

Schedules. Again, some more. Sorry, but they’re essential for me. I have road marks for all of my mediums going all the way through 2020! But some things, like my ambitious feature-length mocap project, actually take that much preparation. When you’re trying to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for something, you need the luxury of time and a multi-year game plan. And for anyone trying to be an indie anything, you need time to build a platform before you can expect to be successful.

Another thing about schedules – they ensure all months have a fairly even workload. I have allowed myself a hiatus on most things during months where I’ll draft a new novel. Similarly, during months where my novel is in beta, I focus more on non-novel things. I don’t want to reach March and realize all my deadlines have converged at once and I’ve given myself an impossible workload (only to be followed by a month where everything is slow and I’m basically wasting time).

Know your limits. In my prime, I could write 2000 words/hour. That seems like a fantasy now, because I no longer live alone and I have a much earlier bedtime. In fact, I didn’t really have a bedtime two years ago and constantly showed up to work bedraggled. In exchange for getting 8 hours of sleep every day, barely drinking caffeine, and being a decent live-in girlfriend, my maximum daily word count is about 1000 words.

When setting goals, don’t pretend you’re someone you’re not. Remember that sometimes you have sinus headaches, sometimes you want a nap, sometimes you have to work late, sometimes you want to marathon Lost on Netflix. If you schedule yourself like some kind of creative workhorse, you’ll burn yourself out if you meet your goals or you’ll be disappointed if you fail them. Or, like me, you’ll end up at the chiropractor for six months because being hunched over a laptop like a machine crippled your back. >.> Books like “How I Write 10,000 Words A Day” are tempting to emulate, but remember that those people are usually professional writers whose sole job 8 hours a day is to write fiction. For the rest of us working stiffs, especially those of us who want some semblance of a social life even if it’s just with our partner, that’s simply not realistic.

And even with a mere 800 words a day, I’m still writing more than I would have otherwise. It looks like I will complete Paradisa Draft 6 in two months, when it took me 7 months to do the same amount of work on Draft 5.

Priorities. Sleep is now a priority for me. Giving my partner attention is a priority. On the other end of the spectrum, I try to prioritize my art over playing video games and watching TV (which is a shame, because I love Fallout 3 and wish I had time to play it!) But now I’m talking about prioritizing your actual projects. Right now, Paradisa Draft 6 comes before anything else. It’s what I spend the top chunk of my energy on because if everything else fails, I still want a completed manuscript of this book to show for it.

Then there are bonus goals that do not have immediacy behind them, and do not have any particular external deadline (like an anthology reading period) or self-set deadline to meet. I work on these second.

Taking A Day Off. Unfortunately, I did not design a day off into my schedule, which has so far been a terrible idea (as a side point, I’d like to stress that schedules and goals are organic things. Too many people see organization as a prison. It’s not. It’s entirely in your control, and you can make the variables be whatever suits you). When I get the chance to reorient things, I am definitely leaving Saturdays free of responsibility. I never accomplish anything on Saturdays as it is, and I need a day to recharge from the combination of my full time job and the creative work. It’s tempting to shove all your creative projects onto the weekends, but personally, I get a surprising amount done on weeknights. Which leads me to…

Treat writing like it’s your job. Ideally, I will treat Sundays as if I’m a work-from-home writer. Austin works on Sundays, so I have the whole house to myself. I rarely have responsibilities on Sunday aside from household chores and making dinner. So that leaves me 7-8 hours to sit in my office and, for one day every week, pretend like this is my job. I’ve yet to do such a thing – probably because I haven’t given myself Saturdays off yet ;) This is my ultimate goal by the end of the year though, because imagine how productive one could be if they devoted a whole day to writing and creating?

Hope this helps some of you who struggle to find the time or motivation to complete your projects. One of the most admirable methods of creativity that we don’t utilize enough in America is focusing on what you can do with the resources you have rather than aspiring towards goals that are beyond your scale. Time is a resource. Energy is a resource. Find out how much you have of both and work within those limits rather than pretending you have more of either. If you simply commit to working on something – anything – it’s pretty amazing what you can build.